Sell short on chopsticks

Sell short on chopsticks

Living in Australia, it’s normal to pass through Asia en route to just about everywhere. My first time there was in 1994, I spent a summer working in Taipei. I was a cultural shock to the Taiwanese back then - a tall*, large*, red haired girl walking down the streets of Taipei.

My most recent visit to Asia was this year. I spent two weeks on Hokkaido, the north island of Japan. Strangely, the landscape reminded me a lot of the north eastern parts of Europe. But that was not the most strange thing about this trip - rather, it was the observation that, for the first time in a quarter century of ins and outs of Asia, I was no longer the tall*, large* person in the room. In fact, I was pretty much overshadowed by the vast majority of people I encountered (who happened to be of Asian origin).

The population of an entire continent has begun their journey towards becoming supersized.

Worldwide growth. Source ourworldindata.org/obesity

Worldwide growth. Source ourworldindata.org/obesity

The evidence for this growth in Asia can be found on every street corner. The delicacies that have contributed to mass scale obesity in the West, are now everywhere in the East. Hamburger dens, fajita franchises and sticky caramel frappes are edging out traditional eateries. The future will be won by those who sell short on chopsticks, and go long on Asian flavoured fitness apps and gym franchises. 

Today’s idea: Within the next 10 years, the Asian obesity rates will rival those in the rest of the world. I would expect that this will catalyse an explosion in fitness related products and services, targeted specifically towards this market. Asian Zumba gyms, Shanghai Strava, diets, personal trainers, fitness apps. The Asian market is still under-serviced in terms of fitness compared to Australia, USA, Canada and Europe. Jackie Chen and Michelle Bridges should WeChat.


*I’m not actually tall, or specifically large

Sent from the future

Sent from the future